A Better Tomorrow?

by Policy Matters Ohio on December 12th, 2013
December 12th, 2013
   

In our latest eNews: a policy brief on energy efficiency, analysis of what Cuyahoga County’s two largest private nonprofit hospital systems would pay in property taxes if they weren’t exempt, a look at why current rules on help for dislocated workers should stay, and a call to continue federal assistance for the unemployed.

A Better Tomorrow – Among the recommendations in our new energy policy brief: upgrade Ohio’s antiquated electric grid, expand the state’s Advanced Energy Fund, build a 21st century transportation system, and weatherize homes. Smart state policy on energy efficiency can help create jobs and help reboot Ohio’s economic recovery. Let’s go!

Big Break – Cuyahoga County’s two largest private nonprofit hospital systems — the Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals — together would owe tens of millions of dollars a year in additional property tax if their exempt properties in Cleveland were subject to taxation. By one estimate, that would amount to close to $34 million a year, and more than $20 million annually for the Cleveland school district.

Don’t Change It – Since 2005, more than 76,500 Ohio workers have been certified to receive help through Trade Adjustment Assistance. But changes to the program, which provides the most comprehensive set of income and training supports available to dislocated workers, will reduce coverage by eliminating help for service workers and restricting which manufacturing workers can benefit. Policymakers should maintain current rules so that program can reach its full potential.

Left Behind – More than 36,000 Ohioans will see their unemployment compensation cut off just before the new year if Congress does not approve an extension of U.S. support for these benefits. This will hurt workers, communities and the economy. By not including this support in its budget package, Congress is leaving American workers in the lurch. Use this online form to tell your representatives: Don’t cut emergency unemployment benefits.

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