Delaware County

November 1, 2012
   
State overview
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Impact of Ohio’s 2012-13 state budget (HB 153)

Ohio’s budget for 2012 and 2013 cut local government aid by a billion dollars.  This means cuts in services we depend on, from road repair and emergency services to crossing guards, senior transportation and child protective services.  What are the implications for Delaware County?

The state cut the Local Government Fund to the county, forcing Delaware County to make cuts to jurisdictions within the county. The state also cut direct funding to municipalities, and slashed reimbursements for taxes it had eliminated, taxes that businesses and utilities had paid to local governments. School districts and the public library fund were also cut. Losses in calendar years 2012 and 2013, compared to 2010 and 2011, include, among others:

  • Public Library Fund……………. -$163.0 thousand
  • Schools…………………………… -$12.8 million
  • County operations………………. -$5.4 million  (including county undivided fund) 
  • Genoa Township……………….. -$124.0 thousand
  • Orange Township………………. -$785.0 thousand
  • Delaware…………………………. -$183.0 thousand
  • Sunbury…………………………… -$63.0 thousand
  • B and G Fire District……………. -$60.0 thousand
  • Tri-Township Fire District……… -$92.0 thousand

Losses to health and human service levies

  • Mental health/developmental disabilities………. -$1.2 million
  • Delaware County 911………………………………… -$100.0 thousand
  • Delaware County Health Dept…………………….. -$203.0 thousand
  • Delaware County senior services…………………… -$236.0 thousand  

Notes and quotes

“You either have to reduce staff or you do without other things” – Delaware County Commissioners President Dennis Stapleton. From Manning, Allison.  “Delaware County sheriff warned to pare budget.”  The Columbus Dispatch. December 2, 2011.  http://tinyurl.com/bmpmers.

“The treasurer has said publicly and the last community forum that by closing the Radnor Elementary building that we could run another three years. So what is the plan then after three years? Do we close up shop and, you know, board up the windows?” – David Kessler, resident; Two plans under consideration for coping with budget cuts include: cutting 30 staff positions, cutting sports and raising play-to-pay fees, or closing Buckeye Valley North Elementary School.  From Wainfor, Steve. “Buckeye Valley School District Facing Big Cuts.”  Nbc4i.com. March 12, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/cpyngw8.  

Delaware City Schools eliminated two positions and the Latin Department at Hayes High School. The school system also considered eliminating another 27.5 positions, changing kindergarten to an alternating full day program, limiting extra- curricular and curricular trips to a 50-mile radius, reducing the number of field trips by 50 percent, and eliminating German 1 at Hayes High School.  From “Delaware City Schools Board of Education: Regular Meeting.” March 14, 2011.  http://tinyurl.com/bnprkrg.

In the Buckeye Valley School District, voters turned down an income tax and bond issue.  As a result, they had to shut down an elementary school.  From Yost, Denise, “Failed Levies, Cuts Cause Concern About Larger Classroom Sizes.”  Nbc4i.com. August 13, 2012.  http://tinyurl.com/bmrm3am.

NOTES:  The current state budget cuts the Local Government Fund to counties, municipalities and townships by 25 percent in the first year and by 50 percent in the second year. This 77-year old state revenue sharing program has, for generations, been essential to helping Ohio communities fund schools, provide services, and lift people out of poverty.  The current state budget also phases out most of the tangible personal property tax and public utility property tax reimbursements, which were promised to local governments when the state cut taxes in recent years.  These are not the only losses to local governments because of this budget.  There are others in specific programs.  Here we detail some of the bigger shifts.  Change in revenues shown here include: 1) Local Government Fund “County Undivided Fund,” which counties share with their cities, townships and villages. We show how much less money the counties are receiving under the current 2-year state budget (for 2012 and 2013) compared to the two years under the prior state budget (which was for 2010 and 2011).   Here the funds are shown on a calendar year basis because that is how the tax department forecasts and records their distribution to local governments, and it is how local governments budget;   2) Local Government “Municipal Direct” allocation from the Local Government Fund that the state gives directly to municipalities with an income tax.  This is also shown in terms of funding provided in the calendar years 2012 and 2013 compared to 2010 and 2011; and 3) Property tax reimbursements promised to local governments during tax reductions enacted earlier in the decade; loss of funding in calendar years 2012 and 2013 is compared to the level of funding provided in 2010 and 2011.   The figures for changes in funding levels are based on data provided by and spreadsheets online at the Ohio Department of Taxation for local government funds and tax reimbursement distributions. 

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